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A chocolate fragrance

Who says Easter obviously says chocolate... And what better than to make you discover perfumes with gourmet notes during a fun and instructive egg hunt, discover the history and architecture of this generous note.



Why do we love the smell of chocolate so much?

Because it puts us in a good mood! According to American comic artist and illustrator, John G T: 9 out of 10 people love chocolate and the tenth lie. Yes, cocoa brings a quick feeling of relief by boosting our production of serotonin, the good mood hormone; renowned for its anti-stress effect, it also contributes to this feeling of well-being. Throughout history, chocolate has been presented as a stimulant and an aphrodisiac. Chocolate contains some of the compounds produced by the brain when we fall in love, which could be one of the reasons why it's so popular as a Valentine's Day gift and such an addictive note in perfumery.


Not surprising to find notes of chocolate in home fragrances and in olfactory diffusion. The smell of chocolate whets the appetite!

From its South American origins, chocolate is certainly one of the favorite dishes of all gourmets on earth! Born from the cocoa bean and then from its butter, it transforms and adds up to create the delicious material that moves us all... And not only on the culinary level; for ten days, researchers from the University of Hasselt, Belgium, specialists in olfactory marketing, diffused a subtle smell of chocolate in a bookstore in the city. As a result, customers stayed in the store longer and made more purchases. Cookbooks of course, but also romance novels, sales of which have jumped 40%! No doubt: The smell of chocolate brings up concepts associated with it in the brain, pushing customers to act differently. Since chocolate is linked to pleasure and desire, its smell has prompted buyers to turn to novels that evoke the same emotions.


Chocolate is also, thanks to "Angel", a note present in beautiful gourmet and sweet, fruity or tangy flavours, there too it leaves no one indifferent!


THE CHOCOLATE NOTE IN PERFUMERY

No one had dared to make the crazy bet that chocolate could be a raw material in perfumery. Thierry Mugler did it with brio and talent with "Angel" in 1992 and revolutionised the classics of the time. This fragrance is daring and sensual and envelops us in an almost addictive indulgence! The citrus top notes offer a fruity and exotic heart while stretching towards a deep trail of notes of vanilla, patchouli but also caramel and chocolate! A beautiful audacity which will have the merit of opening the enchanted parenthesis of gourmet and sweet perfumes while having attracted a crowd of admirers who still adore "Angel" as a great success in women's perfumery!



The note of chocolate will particularly please with the family of oriental perfumes with gourmet or fruity facets.


MY SELECTION OF "CHO-CHO-CHOCOLATE" PERFUME


1- Noir de Noir by Tom Ford (Harry Fremont and Jacques Cavallier) A floral amber chocolate patchouli fragrance. While many patchouli flavours tend to be dry, herbal, and even bitter, Noir de Noir is sweet, chocolaty, and savoury. Rose, saffron and truffle elevate the blend while adding sensual personality to the fragrance.


2- L'Instant de Guerlain Pour Homme (Béatrice Piquet) A masterful blend of cocoa, patchouli and star anise. The spicy element in the top notes gives the perfume a savoury character while the patchouli and cocoa maintain the gourmand and irresistibly sensual nature of the composition.


3- Jo Malone Blue Agava & Cocoa Cologne (Jo Malone) Raw unrefined cocoa contrasts with sea salt and together reveal the sensuality of vetiver, cinnamon and musk. A cologne scent that combines the tart notes of fresh lime and grapefruit with the depth and sweetness of chocolate giving the whole a delicious appeal. Awesome and unique.


For your home fragrance and a tailor-made creation with Eco.French.Lab, the Chocolate note will bring you warmth and comfort. Gourmet, sensual and deep, it will be appreciated in a thousand ways to combine and magnify it.




Anne-Marie Spencer

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